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The definition of mindful practice is “non-judgmental observation”. This attitude, of noticing without judging, is the key to thoughtful recognition of what makes someone behave the way they do. It is also the root of someone’s ability to change their behaviors.
Judgment, shame, and condemnation are all part of the addiction experience.

Even those addicts who are able to successfully hide their addiction from their friends and family can heap negativity upon themselves.  Without even knowing it, addicts who talk to themselves unkindly can harm their own mental health, driving themselves further into addictive behaviors.  Managing our own internal monologue and self-criticism is, unfortunately, something we don’t tend to learn as we grow up.  In fact, if we are exposed to people who are negative, highly critical, judgmental or angry as small children, we may internalize their patterns of speech and thought as part of our own internal patterns, leaving us vulnerable to sneaky depression, unexplained anxiety and feelings of failure.

For addicts in recovery, or anyone who suspects they might suffer from an internal voice that’s not so nice, there are skills and treatments that can help mitigate the negativity.  The good news is that anyone who is self-aware enough to know that there is negative self-talk going on is fully capable of harnessing that process for growth and development.  Anyone can turn it around and become a stronger person.  All they need is a set of skills which can be learned through the practice of mindfulness.

Practicing mindfulness may bring thoughts of monks meditating or peaceful days staring at the ocean.  While meditation can certainly be one form of mindfulness, so can biking through a canyon or running.  To be mindful, one does not need to be still and bored!  A sense of determined focus, attention and the time and space to engage with oneself is all that is needed.  

The definition of mindful practice is “non-judgmental observation”.  This attitude, of noticing without judging, is the key to thoughtful recognition of what makes someone behave the way they do.  It is also the root of someone’s ability to change their behaviors. Someone can choose what aspect of their life, themselves, or addiction they wish to focus on.  It could be a feeling, a thought, or a behavior.  It’s great for recovering addicts to put themselves in a safe environment, and apply their attention to noticing what comes to mind.  It’s important for them recall what they notice.  If they find their thoughts wandering from their chosen topic of focus, gently and easily float the thoughts back to their place.  Not only will the recovering addict find insights, they will be amazed with their capability to be kind to themselves.

Distributed by Client Initiative

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Company Name: Casa Recovery
Contact Person: Debra
Email: stracy@casarecovery.com
Phone: 888-928-2272
Address:31877 Del Obispo St.
City: San Juan Capistrano
State: CA
Country: United States
Website: www.casarecovery.com

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