The old adages that suggest recovery candidates give up one addiction at a time, in order that the patients aren’t overburdened with the difficulties of addiction recovery, have simply been proven false.
For many people entering addiction recovery therapy, the idea of giving up one substance they are working to eliminate is frightening.

For those patients who have multiple addictions, the idea of eliminating everything addictive from their lives can be downright terrifying.  For many years, the best treatment professionals and psychologists advised patients being treated in recovery not to take on too much at one time.  If there were multiple addictions in play, the patient should face them one at a time, building on success.  The failure in an attempt to eliminate a substance from an addict’s life could short-circuit any further attempts at recovery, so the most important thing is to allow the addiction recovery patient to succeed.  While that philosophy of treatment sounds logical, in actual fact the best successes in recovery are found through in-patient addiction recovery treatment programs which require the patients to leave all addictive substances behind during their addiction recovery treatment.

While it might seem very frightening for a prospective recovery patient to think of giving up alcohol or drugs and cigarettes, caffeine and sugar at the same time, there is empirical and scientific evidence that eliminating any and all addictive substances during recovery actually makes the recovery process easier for the patient.  This concept is not based in subjective guesswork, but in biochemistry.  The old adages that suggest recovery candidates give up one addiction at a time, in order that the patients aren’t overburdened with the difficulties of addiction recovery, have simply been proven false.  Studies (including one study published in the International Journal of Addictive Behaviors by Lemmon, Friedmann and Stein) clearly show that the human brain’s response to one addictive substance can trigger chemical changes which make addiction to any addictive substances even easier for the addict to maintain.

The pathways and chemicals which allow the addict to create an addiction in the first place essentially require reprogramming in order for the patient to attain a recovery which they can hold on to for a long time.  There are enough chemical challenges to an addict in recovery, not to mention following treatment in a recovery program when sober living can offer even more challenges.  There are only a maximum of 300 cells in the entire adult brain that can help the addict counteract their biochemical, physical addiction.  The patient, and the treatment and recovery program, must make every effort to give the small but incredibly powerful fasciculus retroflexus area of the brain the support it needs to re-program. The addiction center of the brain is critical in an empirical and proven approach to addiction recovery.  The patient’s entire body benefits from the removal of harmful addictive substances, but the brain in a recovery patient benefits the most from the clearing of chemical dependency.

There are many traditional therapists and recovery treatment programs which do not emphasize the biological components of recovery, but the premier, elite treatment programs with the highest levels of success will require patients to support their own efforts by refraining from any addictive substances during treatment.

Distributed by Client Initiative

Media Contact
Company Name: Cold Creek Behavior Health
Contact Person: Scott
Email: scott@addictionfree.com
Phone: 866-523-3596
Address:PO Box 640
City: Kayville
State: Utah
Country: United States
Website: www.addictionfree.com

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