Hiring an interventionist to help perform the intervention is always a great step in performing a successful intervention.
When one is suffering from a self-destructive harmful addiction, they sometimes need help in realizing they are suffering from a problem. Addiction can be like having blinders on; the addict cannot see the harm they are causing in their lives and the lives around them. This is when an intervention may be helpful.

How does an intervention work?

The first part of an intervention is the planning. Gather important people in the addict’s life such as family, close friends who do not participate in the addiction, and members of the family church. With the help of an interventionist, determine the place of the intervention. It should be a place that the addict can easily go to without suspicion. Research into a rehabilitation facility should be done, finding an appropriate place for them to go to for treatment after the intervention. All those involved in the intervention should meet a couple of times prior to rehearse how the intervention will happen. Role playing may be utilized to prepare for different scenarios.  

It is very helpful to have letters prepared to read to the addict explaining how their behaviors are affecting their lives, using “I” statements to state facts and bringing up specific pieces of evidence such as things that have happened as a result of their addiction. Have consequences for the addict if they do not accept the treatment help. An example of this is no longer allowing them to live in the house if they do not accept help. All of this needs to be done without the addict knowing.

The day of the intervention

In employing a professional interventionist, you can be sure that the intervention will be well-planned and have a much higher chance at satisfactory results. The intervention will bring up anger, resentment, and emotional pain. Be prepared for resistance from the addict. An interventionist will facilitate and be a mediator, keeping the intervention under control and on track.

By the time the day of the intervention comes, everyone who is to be involved should be well-rehearsed, eliminating anyone who is not conducive to the process. The addict should be summoned to the meeting place. After the intervention is performed, it is important to follow through with any consequences set for not going to treatment.         

If the addict chooses to go to treatment, support during the treatment process should be given. It is essential to attend the family groups and family therapy sessions that the treatment facility offers in order to heal from addiction together.

Distributed by Client Initiatives

Media Contact
Company Name: New Start Recovery
Contact Person: David Burke
Email: Dburke@newstartrs.com
Phone: 866-303-6275
Address:5072 Chasity Court
City: Paradise
State: California
Country: United States
Website: http://www.newstartrs.com/

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