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Creating a trusted, supportive and engaged community of people who love the addict is one of the best gifts that a friend or family member can give someone in recovery.
An addict is someone who is uniquely able to focus on the negative. At the root of addiction is the addict’s internalization of negativity which may stem from early experience, learned behavior, or a simple biological or chemical imbalance.

Feelings of inadequacy and worthlessness, negative self-talk and isolation are hallmarks of addiction. These feelings surface far before addictive behavior does in most cases. Sometimes, feelings of depression and anxiety are present for decades before the addict finally approaches the stage of physical addiction.

While it can be incredibly difficult, the loved ones and friends of an addict are a great resource for providing positive feedback and encouragement to the addict. Emotional, financial and mental resources can be drained through association with an addict, and the importance of supporting someone who constantly evades help can seem futile.  The requirements of being involved with an addict are simple ones: maintaining acceptance and love can support the foundational emotional health of the addict in spite of the work of the disease, addiction.

When it becomes clear that the addict is ready to accept recovery from substance abuse or addiction as a possibility in their life, the loving and supportive family may reach deep to accommodate the request for help.  After all, there is nothing more worthwhile and financially rewarding than returning someone to a sober, productive and fulfilling life.  If a person has a relapse following recovery, however, sometimes friends and relatives will balk at further attempts.  The emotional cost of expecting recovery to last can be too devastating when relapse happens.

Loving an addict is a challenging and difficult experience.  There are supportive community resources that exist for just that reason. Giving the individual resources to continue loving the addict, while not enabling the addiction, is the best set of skills that can come from one of these programs.  The second best thing is a knowledge beyond a doubt that there are others in the world experiencing the same sort of difficulties they are, and that there are ways to continue without being destroyed as a side-effect of the addiction.

Staying positive and encouraging for an addict in recovery can be trying and require all the resources a person has at their disposal; however, there is empirical and objective evidence that the addict is best served by positive reinforcement of their capabilities, traits and strengths. The focus on the negative, weaknesses, or failings that addicts carry around is not going to help them achieve their greatest potential, or wake up feeling one with the world.  Creating a trusted, supportive and engaged community of people who love the addict is one of the best gifts that a friend or family member can give someone in recovery.  Identifying and making use of those personal gifts that everyone has, and using those gifts to make the weaknesses less forceful, is one of the ways to find a recovery that works, and lasts.

Distributed by Client Initiatives

Media Contact
Company Name: Strength Based Spirtual Recovery
Contact Person: Dr. William Gordon
Email: w.gordon@sbsrecovery.com
Phone: 949-298-7400 x4
Address:9891 Irvine Center Drive Suite #240
City: Irvine
State: CA
Country: United States
Website: http://www.sbsrecovery.com

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