Home » Family & Parenting, Health & Medicine, Lifestyle, Living, Society & Culture » Marriage Counseling as a Part of Drug Treatment
When a couple enters marriage counseling, the counselor usually makes the couple both sign a sobriety agreement to assure that neither one will use during counseling. This is to ensure the effectiveness of the therapy.
Even the strongest relationships do not always persevere through an addiction.

Addiction is a strong force that can get in between some of the closest couples. It does not matter if one person in the relationship is addicted, or if both are, making the relationship based off of the drug use, addiction will take over and make it difficult to have a functioning relationship. 

When one, or both, of the addicts in the relationship decides to enter treatment, the many problems that face the couple tend to surface, especially if they were both addicted and only one is recognizing the addiction. If they do not both seek help for their disease, the partner who is not getting help for the addiction will feel resentful and angry. The best option is to enter marriage, or couples, counseling. When a couple enters marriage counseling, the counselor usually makes the couple both sign a sobriety agreement to assure that neither one will use during counseling. This is to ensure the effectiveness of the therapy.

The counselor hears the concerns of each partner in the relationship and assesses the damage being caused. The common problems will be dealt with first. Here are some of the most common issues couples face:

  • Infidelity: This does not always mean having an affair with a person. In relationships in which one partner is an addict, and the other is not, the same feelings that are associated with infidelity arise because the non-using partner feels as if their other half is having an affair with a drug. The feeling of betrayal is often expressed because the addict is putting their drug or alcohol before their loved one.
  • They do not know how to come to a resolution of their differences: Often times, couples bicker over little things; however, when drugs are involved, they will have arguments over things that other couples simply do not. Often, couples argue over whether or not one, or both, actually has a drug problem.
  • Trouble With Communication: The most common difficulty plaguing couples is a disruption in the flow of communication. It takes time, effort, and practice to learn to communicate with one another.
  • When Separation Seems Like A Viable Option: When children are involved, and one partner is using, it is always a good idea to separate the addict from the living space of the children because of the dangers that are associated with the lifestyle of addiction. In cases of abuse, it is also a good idea for the abuser to separate from the partner they are abusing. There are also instances in which one partner is enabling their addicted other half. Boundaries must be established in order to stop the addicted partner from using the other partner to get drugs and live an addicted lifestyle.

Addiction can tear apart a relationship swiftly. It can hurt one partner to see the other suffering from addiction, or they can suffer together, which is an even more challenging circumstance to get out of. When one half of the relationship decides to get help for their drug addiction, they are making a step to repair themselves, which in turn, will potentially repair the relationship.

Distributed by Client Initiatives

Media Contact
Company Name: South Coast Mission
Contact Person: Diana
Email: info@southcoastmission.com
Phone: (949) 297-4446
Address:26981 Vista Terrance, Suite A
City: Lake Forest
State: California
Country: United States
Website: www.southcoastmission.com

Comments are closed.