Greater self-confidence, motivation and empathy with peers were exhibited by those who participated in Arts programs.
At a time when research proves that Arts education can provide far-reaching benefits for all students, including at-risk teens, many schools are eliminating Arts education from their schools.

Due to budget constraints, Arts programs have been one of the first to be cut. Although the schools still maintain their other curriculum agendas, the loss of the Arts programs leaves a deficit in the lives of many students who could have benefited, both educationally and emotionally, from this form of expression.

A 2012 study published in a report by the US National Endowment for the Arts showed that teenagers and young adults of low socio-economic status who are involved in Arts activities have better academic results, higher career goals and better work opportunities. It was discovered that young adults who had intensive Arts experiences in high school are more likely to show civic-minded behavior than those who did not.  Greater self-confidence, motivation and empathy with peers were exhibited by those who participated in Arts programs. When gathering evidence from a wide range of school and community-based Arts programs, studies have reflected that Arts exposure for teens was helpful in resolving conflicts, deterring problems due to disruptive behavior and helpful in building the self-respect, resilience, empathy and collaborative skills of the participating teens.

Many parents find that just talking with a teen does not work, even with the assistance of a guidance or family counselor. The teen seems unable to find real change through merely discussing the emotional, psychological, social or educational issues confronting him or her. Parents, at a loss as to where to go from there, have discovered that a successful alternative is available. A counseling effort that combines the help and structure of a trained therapist with the guidance of an Arts professional can be invaluable as a means of leading a struggling teen to a new way of communicating. Through the Arts, including drama, dance, music, painting and other visual arts, the struggling teen, who was unable to verbally express their fears, confusions and pain, is allowed to engage in a new creative forum for self-expression.

Many young people between the ages of 12 and 18 are benefitting from this focused Arts program. Through the concerted efforts of Arts professionals and a committed therapeutic staff, the teens are finding a means of transforming the vision of their world to one of joyful expression. Whatever Art medium appeals to them is utilized as a forum from which they can reflect their inner conflicts and then better identify solutions.


Distributed by Client Initiatives

Media Contact
Company Name: Lava Height Academy
Contact Person: Dane Shakespeare
Phone: 888-837-3581
Address:730 Spring Drive
City: Toquerville
State: Utah
Country: United States

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