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Rising S Bunkers, an underground shelter company in Kemp, TX, has assembled a fantastic list of things you need to know before purchasing an underground bunker or storm shelter. Through this list, buyers are able to learn more about a host of pit falls surrounding the underground shelter industry.

Kemp, Texas – Rising S Bunkers, an underground shelter company in Kemp, TX, has assembled a fantastic list of things you need to know before purchasing an underground bunker or storm shelter. Through this list, buyers are able to learn more about a host of pit falls surrounding the underground shelter industry. Consumers can familiarize themselves with bunker engineering concepts, the strengths and limitations of particular shelter materials, the dangers of “fly-by-night” companies as well as trendy shelter designs that may be bad ideas if you’re not knowledgeable about underground shelters. This list provides buyers with the vital information they need to make good decisions in their shelter planning while helping them avoid risky shelters incapable of providing the quality protection and reliability essential in products engineered for underground purposes.

According to Clyde Scott of Rising S Bunkers, “buying an underground bunker is very different from purchasing a car. Due to so many competing ideas about underground engineering, educating yourself about the product and all the other things you should know before buying a shelter is almost impossible without having the experience to discern factual information from clever marketing. We are striving to provide customers with as much information as possible on underground bunkers.” He continued by saying, “We know that we make the very best bunkers on the market. However; we only believe that because we have the experience, we’ve done the research and collected the facts.  Having been the industry leader for so long, we know all too well about the myriad of obstacles involved with building underground structures.  As a result, we’ve continually improved our product over the years to better serve the consumer and to provide a safer, higher quality product that raises the proverbial bar. We also know about other companies out there that are cutting corners in engineering or making claims that are just untrue, only to increase their profit margin.  That’s why I wanted to make this information available to the public.”

From bad engineering, to faulty materials and even dishonest companies; you don’t have to dig too deep to find instances on the internet where buyers have gone through terrible experiences. To add insult to injury, most of those customers were left having to pay even more money to hire professional experts to fix problems caused by poor craftsmanship or inexperienced installers. In this list of bad ideas published by Rising S Bunkers, they include information on several topics that caution buyers on what steer clear of when considering an underground bunker or storm shelter.

Rising S Bunkers warns that one of the biggest pitfalls in the industry is “Fly-by-Nights” or pop-up companies claiming that they can build a better shelter using inferior materials or at a cheaper price. A quick internet search will lead you to two perfect examples of these fly-by-night companies that were sued for not being able to deliver on their lofty promises.

Radius Engineering and Titan Shelters were both large, seemingly trustworthy companies in their own right. However, Mr. Scott warns that “being a big company and being a reputable company are not one in the same.” Radius Engineering was sued in 2013 for the sum of $2,000,000 for a botched installation of one of their fiberglass shelters called the “Earthcom Dome 60”. Radius claimed that it was the fault of their exclusive installer “Green Eye Technology” and denied any accountability. Radius subsequently went out of business after losing the case. However, today the former lead engineer is still operating in the market under a different business name and even publishing books about shelter engineering.. This only further reiterates owner Clyde Scott’s message about educating yourself before buying a shelter.

Titan Shelters (operated by Al Demola) also came under fire after being met by a seven-count civil complaint in March of 2015. In a lawsuit that alleged that Demola took payments for bomb shelters that he never delivered. (Violating the Consumer Fraud Act and the Home Improvement Contractors’ Registration act and other statutes) Demola was ordered to pay $177,373.00 in damages, restitution and legal fees for three consumers. Additionally the lawsuit found that Demola’s poor business practices were so egregious that he was banned from doing business in New Jersey (where the business was registered and operating from) and Titan Shelters company was dissolved.

“Fly-by-Night companies like these are one of the biggest dangers a consumer will face in their buying process. They are perfect examples of how important it is to be hypervigilant in your research.” says Clyde Scott.  “Working with a company that has a long history of success in the industry and years of experience will ensure that you don’t wind up in a predicament like these.”

Finally, it’s good to reiterate that working with reputable companies possessing the experience and documentation needed to guide you along your journey is your best bet. What you should know before buying an underground bunker is all consolidated in the Rising S Bunkers “Bad Ideas” page and it can really make a huge difference in the outcome of your shelter project. Get in touch with Rising S Bunkers via email, by phone or by visiting http://www.risingsbunkers.com/.

About Company:

Rising S Bunkers

15500 Turner Line Road

Kemp, Texas 75143

Media Contact
Company Name: Rising S Bunkers
Contact Person: Clyde Scott
Email: clyde@risingscompany.com
Address:15500 Turner Line Road
City: Kemp
State: Texas
Country: United States
Website: http://www.risingsbunkers.com/

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