The True Face of An Epidemic: A Day in The Life of a Heroin User

A modern spin on a tale as old as time put the story of Dan, Candy and their love for heroin in the spotlight. If you haven’t seen the movie, the storyline follows a poet who falls madly in love with an art student while their relationship gets consumed by passion and addiction. While all of that may sound warming and charming, the sight of needles being jabbed in their arms, the side-effects, the addiction and the heartbreak of oblivion, self-destruction and despair emphasizes once again the devastating effects of heroin on people’s lives.

Heroin ranks third in Canada’s most commonly injected drug by street youth. Big H, Horse, Poppy or Hell dust are just some of the nicknames heroin operates under. Stereotypes don’t sit at the heart of addiction. Neither do lack of morals, discipline or irresponsibility. In reality, addiction is a chronic illness and it can affect anyone anywhere – there is no pattern.

An American survey by Take 5 Media Group for Addictions.com looked at 1,057 people across all 50 statesaimed to explore the daily struggles of users and their drug of choice. Over half of respondents were male. Many people feel like they could pick out a person who uses heroin from a crowd, but in reality, they might just have to think again.

About 2 in 3 people surveyed reported being employed (with the most common job being that of manager) and spending just under the price of a dinner ($27) on getting their daily fix. After a night’s rest that could mean anything between your normal five to ten hours of sleep, they wake up in the morning, they put on their clothes for the day and surprisingly, make time for breakfast with 65% reporting doing so and generally going for an omelette or a sunny side up egg.

These findings are something to really think about. It could be the person sitting next to you on the subway, it could be your friendly neighbour or your chatty co-worker, even one of your friend or relative and you wouldn’t be able to notice it right away.

Heroin withdrawal is notoriously difficult, not to mention painful. It usually kicks off between 6 to 12 hours after the last fix with the worst of symptoms being felt up to 70 hours later. When the pain is numbing and the craving for a fix, heroin strips people’s personality away. That is why having the right support can make a world of a difference. Inspire Change are one of Canada’s addiction treatment centers for men. What sets them apart is their approach to recovery which recognizes the uniqueness of each case and the need for customized care.

Candy does not have a happy ending, but that doesn’t mean everything is doomed. Help is always available.

Media Contact
Company Name: Inspire Change Wellness For Addiction Treatment
Contact Person: Louis Grant
Email: Send Email
Phone: (888) 277-2145
Address:15216 North Bluff Road Suite # 509 White Rock
City: Vancouver
State: British Columbia V4B 0A7
Country: Canada
Website: https://addictionhealingcentre.ca/