“Kick Off Your Shoes!” Says Cindy Klement Stop Tracking Toxic Chemicals into Homes

Author & Speaker Tells Us Why It’s Important to Take Off Your Shoes Indoors!

Ann Arbor, MI, USA – If you ask guests to take off their shoes as soon as they enter your front door, you’re likely doing so to avoid getting dirt all over your home. Cindy Klement explains that you should be concerned about more than just the dirt on their shoes.

According to Klement, 74% of U.S. households use an average of 3 to 4 pesticides per home and there are residues on surfaces that have never even been treated.

This can be the result of those who work on construction sites or industries that involve chemicals. Klement explains that it’s very likely for these types of workers to collect chemicals on their shoes and carry them into homes.

“Chemicals commonly used on lawns and in gardens also get tracked into the home on shoes and can be detected in the bodies of both adults and children,” says Klement. She notes that while the half-life of most lawn herbicides is 5 weeks, they can still be found in soil one year after treatment.

Klement is the author of Your Body’s Environmental Chemical Burden- A Resource Guide to Understanding and Avoiding Toxins. She is an adjunct professor at Eastern Michigan University, and an advisory board member of Community Supported Anthroposophic Medicine, as well as the Health Practitioners Advisory Council.

Klement recommends using plants as natural pesticides. She mentions advice from Treehugger.com, which is a website dedicated to driving sustainability mainstream. Treehugger.com suggests using plantings of parsley, sage, rosemary, thyme, basil, chives, dill, mint and oregano to fend off moths, flies, beetles, worms, ants, and other insects.

“Maybe you don’t have room for 9 additional plants. That’s okay. If you are looking for alternatives to pesticides, fungicides, herbicides, insecticides and fertilizer, your search begins at Beyond Pesticides for a list of products compatible with landscape management,” says Klement.

Klement encourages people to try Garden’s Alive products because they are affordable and effective. She discovered them about 23 years ago when she was trying to find a solution to a moth infestation in her pantry. Garden Alive’s cardboard tent had a dry adhesive lining with a scent that attracted the moths, which stuck to the wall when they made their way in.

Your Body’s Environmental Chemical Burden- A Resource Guide to Understanding and Avoiding Toxins, ISBN 978-1-7327049-6-1, 2018, MindStir Media, paperback, $19.99, Kindle $6.95, 268 pages, available on Amazon.

About Cindy Klement

Cindy Klement, MS, CNS, MCHES, is an adjunct professor at Eastern Michigan University, and an advisory board member of Community Supported Anthroposophic Medicine, as well as the Health Practitioners Advisory Council. Among her decades-long training in holistic, alternative, complementary, integrative, and functional medicine, she holds a master’s degree in nutrition from Eastern Michigan University, is a board-certified nutrition specialist, and is accredited as a Master Certified Health Educator by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing.

Visit her website at Cindyklement.com.

Media Contact:

For a review copy of Your Body’s Environmental Chemical Burden or to arrange an interview with Cindy Klement, contact Scott Lorenz of Westwind Communications Book Marketing at scottlorenz@westwindcos.com or by phone at 734-667-2090.

Follow Lorenz on twitter @abookpublicist.

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